EQUINE CAREERS: EQUINE PEDIGREE ANALYST

Have you ever wondered what all goes into picking which horses to breed to each other? With this career path, you will be able to dive deep into the breeding world and maybe breed the next Valegro or the next Justify. Most Equine Pedigree Analysts work in the racing industry, but they are needed in all areas involving horses.

Job Description


Most Equine Pedigree Analysts do freelance work and their clients include large breeding farms and businesses. Their main job is to pick the best possible combination of sire and dam that will improve the next generation. Most Equine Pedigree Analysts pick a certain breed as their specialty and focus entirely on that one industry of breed. This is most commonly seen in the Thoroughbred industry, but there are plenty of career opportunities involving other breeds and industries.


Duties include:

Meeting with clients

Analyzing data

Evaluate horses in person

Write detailed reports


Lifestyle


Most of the work done by Pedigree Analysts is done in an office setting but it is not uncommon to have to travel to look at horses. They are mostly private consultants, so they have very flexible hours and can work remotely.

Education


There is no specific degree required to become an Equine Pedigree Analyst, but having a strong foundation in genetics will certainly help. To thrive in this career you will need to be comfortable with horses and have some experience with them as well as being proficient in working a computer for analyzing data. You will need to be able to understand conformation in horses and understand market trends in your industry.


Salary

Since there is a lot of variation on specialties and industries there is no set salary for Equine Pedigree Analysts, but the median salary is around $68,000 annually. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the bottom 10% make $38,000 annually and the top 10% can make over $102,000 annually.


Job Outlook


There will probably always be a demand for Equine Pedigree Analysts as long as people are still breeding horses. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, this industry is expected to grow at a rate of 13% in the next 10 years and the overall employment rate to grow 21% in the next 10 years.

I hope some of you were able to get inspired by today's article! I certainly had no idea that this field existed until I started digging deeper into some research for another article. All of the information in today's post comes from thebalancecareers.com and www1.cfnc.org.

Best wishes

-Alison:)

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